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Rob Howard | Tampa, St. Petersburg & Clearwater, FL
 

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Rob Howard

Here’s an interesting exercise: On a piece of paper (or in a word processing document) draw a vertical line down the center of the page. At the top left side, write your company’s name. Across the page, on the top right side, write the name of your most important competitor. Down the left side of the page, write the numbers 1, 2 and 3. Do the same thing on the right side of the page.

Have you ever sat in front of a prospect and thought you should say something – but didn't?

Many of us in sales use the presentation phase for educating the buyer about what we do and what we offer. Does that really make sense strategically?

Sometimes salespeople are a little surprised when we share a simple, time-tested selling principle: a prospect who is listening isn’t really a prospect. What on earth does this mean? Isn’t it a good thing when someone listens to what we have to say during a sales call?

The powerful learning model David Sandler called the Success Triangle is a proven formula for sales success – and a proven formula for every other kind of success. Sales leaders, and all leaders, can benefit from learning about it and implementing it with their teams. You have probably heard about the Success Triangle. So, what is it?

In order to have clearer communication with our sales team, we need to implement, and consistently use, a common process.

What if you treated “no decision” like what it really is: a decision not to move forward, at least not right now?

It’s time for a 21st-century reality check: We all live (and sell) in a ridiculously fast-paced environment.

Do you have to learn to fail to win? This intriguing idea shows up at Number One on the classic list of selling rules developed by David Sandler more than half a century ago. Yet even today, it still throws a lot of people.

One of the classic selling rules David Sandler developed and shared with salespeople sounds harsh . . . but it’s true. Sandler warned us that “All prospects lie all the time.”